Pickled Pepper Recipe

adminMarch 8, 2022

Pickled Pepper Recipe

Pickled Pepper Recipe

Pickled Pepper Recipe

I’d say a good 20 to 30 percent of my refrigerator space is given over to pickles. I love anything pickled—onions, cabbage, cauliflower, zucchini, and chile peppers. If it’s pickle-able, you’re likely to find a jar of it buried away in the far, deep recesses of my refrigerator. All of the above (and more) are in there right now, marinating as we speak. Or, as I type, I should say.

Unfortunately, that doesn’t leave much room for anything else, which I have to live with. I suppose I could start canning them, but then I’d have to find somewhere to put all those jars. But there’s no way I’m giving up a single pair of the thirty-two sets of shoes in my closet or a single space on my groaning cookbook shelf to give way to a place to store them.

I think I’m almost at risk of turning into one of those people who die, and afterward, pictures of my apartment filled to the brim with stuff appear on websites and daytime talk shows, to the horror of readers from coast-to-coast.

Pickled Pepper

Pickled Pepper

As the camera scans, folks will be shocked to see everything from hundreds of pairs of orange socks (and Trippen shoes) to a closet-load of backup oven handles to a stockpile of kimchi jars that would stun even the most jaded Korean grandmother. That’s my apartment, folks. You read it here first.

I don’t know where I got that “bunker” mentality. Perhaps from my grandmother, who died and left behind a twenty-five-year retrospective of plastic bags – meaning, basically, every plastic bag and twist tie that ever crossed her path. During her declining years, she finally got her house in Los Angeles air-conditioned, which she intimated cost a pretty decent amount of money. Her last words about it to me were—So you’re all going to get a little less when I’m gone. Well too bad!

But another thing that I remember about my grandmother is that she did love to eat, and she enjoyed pickles as much as I do. So when I was in the states recently, I brought back a few pounds of jalapeño peppers. You can get chile peppers at the Arab markets in Paris. Still, there’s something irreplaceable about having jalapeño peppers on hand to chop up and add to a batch of guacamole or serve alongside carnitas. Other chiles aren’t the same.

I was inspired by Michael Ruhlman’s pickled chili recipe, which was not only beautiful to behold (a worthy addition to my “collection”) but simple. I also liked reading his explanation of brining from his new book, Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking, which breaks down all the kitchen basics into simple formulas, including brine, which you can adapt as you wish.
I’m adding it to my well-stocked cookbook bookshelf after it leaves my bedside table, as I love reading about the how’s and why’s of cooking and baking. Kinda like “normal” people make their bedside reading, say…fiction or biographies.

Pepper Recipe

Pepper Recipe

Or keep their refrigerator stocked with things like milk, vegetables, eggs, and other necessities…instead of cramming it full of pickles, which fits perfectly into that group in my mind (and stomach).

Pickled Jalapenos

Adapted from Michael Symon’s Live to Cook by Michael Symon and Michael Ruhlman, As Michael says in his book, you can use the brine for everything from roast chicken to green beans to curing your homemade pastrami. Now that’s something that would make my grandmother proud.

Servings 4 servings

  1. 1 pound (450g) of fresh jalapeno peppers, washed (see Note)
  2. 2 1/2 cups (625ml) water
  3. 2 1/2 cups (625ml) vinegar (I used white distilled vinegar)
  4. Three tablespoons sugar
  5. Three tablespoons of coarse salt, such as kosher
  6. Two bay leaves
  7. Two tablespoons of whole coriander seeds
  8. Three cloves of garlic, peeled
  9. Two tablespoons of black peppercorns
  10. Stab each pepper three times with a sharp paring knife and place them in a large glass preserving jar
Pickled Jalapenos

Pickled Jalapenos

In a non-reactive saucepan, bring the other ingredients to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for five minutes.
Remove from heat and pour the brine over the peppers. Place the lid on the jar and let cool. Once cool, refrigerate for at least a week before using, if possible. (You can use them sooner, but Michael says they’re worth the wait.)

Notes

Serve whole with Mexican dishes, remove the seeds, then chop and use to season any recipe that is improved by a little bit of sweet heat. Storage: I’ve kept pickles like this for up to a few weeks, under refrigeration, without any problems. But like anything preserved, you should take precautions. If you wish to keep them longer, you can use these canning instructions and guidelines. Note: You can use another chile pepper in place of the japeños.

Pickled Jalapenos

Pickled Jalapenos

If you like this recipe, then I would suggest that you should try this recipe too: French Rice Pudding Recipe

For more recipes, please pay a visit to this: Recipes

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